Cancer Alliance Stigma Survey

Cancer stigma is a great problem in South Africa, it touches all groups, ages and genders and impacts cancer patients daily.

With our current survey we aim to gain more information and insight into the role of cancer stigma in our communities.

- Cancer Alliance Stigma Survey -

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Resources and Library

Informative Breast Cancer Articles

Thursday, June 02, 2016

Invasive Breast Cancer: Symptoms, Treatments, Prognosis Read more

Advocates for Breast Cancer

Thursday, June 02, 2016

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Stockists of Breast Prosthesis

Tuesday, May 31, 2016

 REACH FOR RECOVERY                    REIK NA HERSTEL Read more

Weblinks for newly diagnosed Cancer Patients

Tuesday, May 31, 2016

The following links are trustworthy and useful: Read more

Cancer, Pilates and Quality of Life

Tuesday, May 31, 2016

My name is Claire Terink owner of FACE IT Studio in Claremont. I have seen the great success has brought to my recovering and in treatment cancer patients. I hope to inspire you to gain/regain the confidence to start some safe physical exercise and how Pilate’s core concepts are perfectly suited to support and benefit you at whatever stage you are at. Read more

Russell Kaplan's Cancer Journey

Tuesday, May 31, 2016

At the age of 20, Russell Kaplan, then a student at the University of Cape Town, was diagnosed with lung cancer, which plunged him and his family into a state of crisis. What follows is the story of his journey from fighting the cancer as an enemy, to the acceptance of his dying. Read more

Cancer Survival Toolbox

Monday, February 08, 2016

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The Art of Caregiving (Book)

Monday, February 08, 2016

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The Truth behind three Natural Cancer "Cures"

Wednesday, November 11, 2015

The Truth behind Three Natural Cancer “Cures”

By Maureen Salamon 

on Tuesday, August 25, 2015

Cannabis oil is often heralded as a treatment for cancer and other diseases, but there’s no science to support these claims.

Summary

Therapies such as acupuncture and massage can be a useful complement to conventional methods of treating cancer. But “cure-all” solutions that claim to eliminate disease naturally aren’t proven to work — and can actually be dangerous for people with cancer.

Highlights
  • Complementary therapies can be used as adjuncts to mainstream cancer care.
  • But using unproven cures can be harmful for cancer patients.
  • They also haven’t been shown to work.
  • Some of these can hamper the effectiveness of treatment.
  • Mainstream therapies are more successful and less damaging than ever.

The Internet is full of “miracle cures” for cancer and alleged surefire ways to prevent it, and well-meaning people may urge cancer patients to just try them out in hopes of eliminating their disease. Some patients, worried that conventional treatments won’t work or pose significant side effects, seek a treatment whose effectiveness isn’t actually supported by scientific evidence or may even prove dangerous. During a time of uncertainty and anxiety, it’s understandable that any hope for a cure — even if it isn’t medically proven — is tempting.

“Patients want something ‘natural’ to try to treat their cancer or prevent their cancer from coming back,” says Memorial Sloan Kettering pharmacist and herbalist K. Simon Yeung. “But the people promoting these treatments might not necessarily have a medical or oncology background. In addition, patients who try these therapies may find, when they come back to seek mainstream treatment, that it’s too late and their cancer has already spread.”

Dr. Yeung is manager of the About Herbs database, created and maintained by MSK’s Integrative Medicine Service. The service provides complementary therapies such as acupuncture, music therapy, and massage that are used in addition to — not as alternatives for — mainstream cancer approaches such as chemotherapy, radiation, and surgery.

Here, Dr. Yeung explains the hype and the scientific evidence surrounding three highly publicized but unproven therapies: cannabis oil, Laetrile, and a pH-manipulation (also known as alkaline) diet.

Cannabis Oil

The hype: Cannabis oil is often heralded as a treatment to destroy or shrink cancerous tumors, as well as a cure for diabetes, ulcers, arthritis, migraines, insomnia, infections, and many other diseases. Also called marijuana oil or hemp oil, it’s extracted from marijuana plants, often with higher proportion of a compound known as CBD (cannabidiol), which has less of a psychoactive effect than the more-famous THC (tetrahydrocannabinol) compound that gets marijuana users high.

Cannabis oil is available in several forms with different potencies. It can be infused into cooking oil that users squirt under the tongue or mix into food. Its vapors can also be inhaled. By federal law, cannabis products are illegal, though several states have enacted laws to legalize their medical use.  

The evidence: While commercially available cannabis compounds are FDA-approved to reduce cancer treatment–related side effects such as nausea and vomiting and to improve appetite, no clinical trials have shown that cannabis products can treat cancer.

Claims that cannabis oil cures cancer are anecdotal and largely unsupportable, based on scant research done in mice and in labs. Side effects can include memory and attention loss. Perhaps most important, there is evidence that cannabis compounds may inhibit enzymes that patients need to metabolize other anticancer drugs, thereby increasing their toxicity or reducing their effectiveness.   

The verdict: “So far, there are no human studies that show cannabis oil can be used as cancer treatment,” Dr. Yeung says. “Patients who are using it — or any form of marijuana — should let their doctors know so they can advise you properly.”


Laetrile

The hype: Laetrile, first popularized as a cancer therapy in Russia and the United States more than a century ago, is the trade name for a purified form of amygdalin, an extract derived from apricot pits and some nuts and plants. Intestinal enzymes break down Laetrile to produce cyanide, which proponents claim kills cancer cells and leaves normal tissue unharmed. Some also claim that Laetrile is actually a vitamin called B-17 and that deficiencies can cause certain cancers. Banned in the United States, an oral form of Laetrile is available in other countries.

The evidence: Laetrile indeed breaks down into cyanide, but the poison doesn’t just selectively strike cancer cells — it can sicken or kill patients as well. Clinical studies done in the 1970s and 1980s, including those sponsored by the National Institutes of Health, indicated that Laetrile didn’t reduce malignant tumors’ size or growth, but some patients experienced cyanide poisoning.   

The verdict: “Laetrile has not been proven to be effective against cancer and can even be dangerous to some patients,” Dr. Yeung says. “If amygdalin is eventually used in an anticancer drug, it will have to be in a different form, because the oral form is toxic and too dangerous to use.”


Manipulating pH Levels through Diet

The hype: Based on the scientific observation that cancer cells thrive in an acidic environment — meaning low pH levels — some people contend that highly “acidic” foods such as meat, cheese, and grain products raise the risk of cancer by reducing pH levels in the blood. They claim that eating “alkaline” foods such as fruit, green vegetables, and other plant-based products discourages the growth of cancer cells by raising blood pH levels and tout the benefits of the alkaline diet (also known as the alkaline ash diet or alkaline acid diet).

The evidence: Cancer cells create an acidic microenvironment due to a high metabolic rate. Cancer cells can’t live in a highly alkaline environment, but neither can healthy cells. Your body works to keep pH levels constant, and changing your diet is not going to substantially change the pH levels of your blood, which are tightly regulated by the kidneys and lungs regardless of foods consumed.

The pH of bodily fluids, such as saliva and urine, does change temporarily depending on the foods you eat, but that doesn’t affect blood pH levels (or, hence, the environment of cancer cells in the body). In fact, any significant deviation in blood pH levels can cause serious, even life-threatening conditions known as acidosis (low pH) or alkalosis (high pH)

The verdict: “There is no evidence that changing your diet to alter pH levels affects cancer growth,” Dr. Yeung says. “The actual science has been misinterpreted. Changing the pH in your saliva doesn’t mean your blood pH changes. Some patients try using chemicals to modify their blood pH, but that can be extremely dangerous.”

https://www.mskcc.org/blog/truth-behind-three-natural-cures

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